DJC Green Building Blog

Contests galore! Win a DJC tote bag or a green commercial kitchen

Posted on September 10, 2008

Loyal readers! Today I come to you offering some great prizes for your continuous attention to the DJC Green Building Blog.

DJC publisher Phil Brown models the green tote
DJC Publisher Phil Brown models the green tote

The first (and definitely the best) is a spectacular, new DJC reusable tote bag.  Afraid of being charged 20 cents per bag at your local grocery store? Forget about it with this

strong, stable and lightweight tote! Modeled at left by the DJC's stylish Publisher Phil Brown, and bearing the DJC's customary insignia ("helping business do business since 1893"), it's sure to be your favorite new accessory.

If you want to be the envy of your many grocery store friends, all you have to do is respond in a comment below to all or part of this question: What is the biggest obstacle to building green, how would you fix it and who do you think should be responsible for fixing it? Bags will be given until supplies runs out.

Our second possible prize (and less certain because it's another organization giving it

You know you want one
You know you want one

You know you want one

away) is a "certified green commercial kitchen" worth $40,000 from a contest sponsored by Foodservicewarehouse.com. The Web site is an online restaurant supply retailer that has created a new green certification for commercial kitchens. To be certified, a commercial kitchen must earn points in energy and water conservation, waste reduction, green cleaning and green education. I can't speak to how stringent the process is and it looks like you might need to buy kitchen goods from the site to earn points, but I guess something is better than nothing. The certification itself seems emblematic of how the idea of green is spreading into new places.

Either way, the kitchen contest is fairly simple. Just go here and enter information by Oct. 31. A link for the contest is also included to the left of this page under 'links.'

Best of luck and happy winning!

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  1. I think the expense or at least the perceived expense of going green is a huge obstacle. My suggestion to fix this problem would be to have more monetary incentives to build green. I believe there should be tax benefits for the owner that decides to build green as well as for the designer and/or builder that helps them go green. If the designers and builders were rewarded for being involved in green projects they may suggest more green ideas. I think some owners aren’t sure how to go green or don’t know what products are green and if they are presented with ideas or options they may decide to use them more readily.

  2. The desire of people for their own back yard and car.

    You know those eco-calculator things? They always work better in really dense neighborhoods where transit is prevalent, no one needs a car, and you can pretty much walk everywhere. If you live in multi-family housing, you will necessarily have less space, use fewer materials; and rely on transit for day to day life. I can’t buy a “green” residence 10 miles out in the country, that is 5,000 square feet and uses solar panels. Every thing going into that residence requires wheeled transport. Now, a high rise on top of a grocery store with a bus stop outside… that makes sense to me.


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