Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

CMU Firewall Saves Multi-Family Structure from Disaster

Monday, December 15th, 2014

photo 3A 50+ year old wood frame apartment complex in Airway Heights caught fire recently.

The structure is a dry wood frame, with a  CMU fire wall separating the building wings.  This building’s CMU fire wall prevented the adjoining wing from catching fire.  The front side of this structure received more damaged than the back which is shown in the photos.

This demonstrates the effectiveness of the CMU firewall component in multi-family and commercial structures.   The masonry industry works hard to continually reaffirm the use of CMU firewalls in buildings in condensed, urban areas to protect the community from major catastrophic fires as well as other energy, lifecycle and environmental factors.

The Masonry Institute of Washington is available to provide additional information on all masonry systems for both constructability and aesthetics.

In time for Thanksgiving, PCL donates $10K to local food banks

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

PCLFoodBank

PCL’s Seattle buildings and civil groups donated $5,000 to Northwest Harvest Food Bank and another $5,000 to Food Lifeline to support those in need. This is the sixth consecutive year the Seattle office has donated to the two food banks for a total of $60,000.

“Thanks to PCL for joining us in the fight against hunger,” said Linda Nageotte, president and CEO of Food Lifeline, in a release. “We see the need for food continue to increase especially among children and seniors, our most vulnerable populations.”

According to Food Lifeline, one in six Washington households struggled with food insecurity at some point during the year, meaning food was uncertain or unable to meet the daily needs of household members.

The checks were presented to the food banks on Nov. 20.

In addition to the Seattle office, 13 other PCL offices across the nation are donating $130,000 to local food banks.

Over the last six years, the company has donated $868,000 nationally. That’s about 7.8 million meals.

Way to go PCL!

Contractors and friends support boatshop revamp

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

In the fall of 2012, AGC’s Seattle District began a partnership with the Center for Wooden Boats (CWB) to improve and repair CWB facilities. The most difficult project to come out of the relationship was the installation of a hoist system to mechanically raise historic small craft out of the water and into the floating boatshop.

 

This complex project was designed and engineered under the supervision of Dan Chandler at OAC Services and his team of professionals. OAC redesigned the existing boatshop by changing the roof line at the north end of the shop and strengthening the rafters to accommodate the 30-foot steel I-beam that cantilevers out over the water.

Dan then recruited other northwest companies to build the project. BNBuilders provided a team of carpenters for two weeks to complete the retrofit of the shop and installation of the beam. Additionally, they footed the bill for the construction materials provided at cost by Gray Lumber. BNB also recruited Precision Electric to rewire the area affected by the retrofit. Yakima Steel fabricated and supplied the custom beam for the shop, while Scott Galvanizing of Ballard finished the raw steel. Ballard Hardware donated the trolley for the I-beam, and Al Wirta of Wirta Architectural in Sultan fabricated the overhead winch and pick-frame system capable of pulling a one-ton keelboat out of the water.

In photo, CWB recently hoisted it first historic Blanchard  knock-about  from the water into the boat shed for repairs — a task  that, for thirty  years, had been accomplished with sheer manpower using  a cranky old  float plane drydock.

One more band-aid for highways

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Never mind.  My last post talked about what could happen if Congress lets the federal highway trust fund goes dry.

But, as AGC of America reports, after weeks of back and forth between the House and Senate, a short-term extension of the current transportation authorization with a temporary funding patch for the Highway Trust Fund was passed before Congress left town for its August recess.  The Senate, by a vote of 81 to 13, agreed to drop support for its amended version of HR 5021 after the House earlier in the day voted to reject it. The Senate version  would have reduced the amount of the transfer by $3 billion and set December 19, 2014 as the authorization deadline.

The final bill transfers $10.8 billion into the Highway Trust Fund, allowing the Trust Fund to support an extension of MAP-21 authorization for the highway and transit programs through May 31, 2015. This transfer was necessary to ensure that the trust fund could meet its funding obligations for the duration of the extension.

H.R. 5021 originally passed the House with an overwhelmingly bipartisan majority on June 15.  On Tuesday, the Senate voted to amend the House-passed bill to shorten the length of the extension from May 31, 2015, to Dec. 20, 2014, and cut the general fund transfer to the Highway Trust Fund from $11 billion to $8 billion.  The passage of the Senate amendment started a game of legislative ping-pong where the House voted to disagree to the Senate amendment by a vote of 271-149 with 226 Republicans and 45 Democrats voting for and 147 Democrats and two Republicans voting against.  Following House action, the Senate withdrew its amendment and the original House bill was sent to the president.

Federal reimbursements to WSDOT could mean fraction of cash-on-hand

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

The fate of the Highway Trust Fund has been a popular topic in recent media reports. The fund faces potential insolvency unless Congress acts by to prevent that from happening. This is a cause of concern for all states, and especially those that heavily depend on federal reimbursements to pay for transportation projects.

As most people know, the Congress has failed to pass a long-term federal highway bill.  As reported by AGC of America, this week the House, by a vote of 367 to 55, approved H.R. 5021, a $10.8 billion Highway Trust Fund patch which provides sufficient revenue to maintain current funding levels through May 2015.  The action now heads to the Senate where there is expected to be debate about limiting the extension until December 31, 2014 with the hope of forcing consideration of a long term transportation bill with sufficient revenue to support it following the mid-term elections in November.

Meanwhile, WSDOT Secretary Lynn Peterson released the following statement:

USDOT Secretary Anthony Foxx informed states on July 1 that if Congress fails to act by Aug. 1, 2014, the Federal Highway Administration will institute uniform cash management procedures to distribute the flow of federal dollars twice a month. So, what does this mean for WSDOT’s programs? It means that over the short term, the amount FHWA will reimburse WSDOT will be limited to a share of the available cash in the fund. Our share is based on our portion of the FFY 2014 federal-formula apportionment, 1.72 percent.

We’ve been good stewards of our resources and by using our strategic investment goals – managing to meet our priorities and critical needs, we can sustain the proportional payments of federal dollars under this plan for four to six months.

We remain hopeful that Congress will act in time to stave off more significant, long-term impacts. Look for more updates as their deadline approaches.

Lynn Peterson, Secretary of Transportation

Sedge of cranes return to roost in Seattle?

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

That’s right, I said “sedge.”  That’s the name for a group of cranes (the bird kind)…you can look it up.

My AGC colleague Sean Lewis shot the video below from our offices on Lake Union.  He counts 18 construction cranes on the city skyline, a pretty high number for our informal “crane index”.  Back in the heyday of 2007, there were 22.  By 2010 there were, oh, zero.  But now we’re all the way back up to 18.  Our crane index is backed up by some recent, and actual, economic data: Construction employment in  Washington State grew 5.5% in the last year — one of the largest increases in  the nation, as reported by AGC of America.  Plus, the Census Bureau  recently announced that Seattle is the fastest growing big city in the  country.

It’s great to see this sedge; long may it roost in Washington State!

 

L&I has some ideas to keep you from falling

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

According to L&I, falls account for the highest number of deaths among construction workers nationally and more than half of all worker hospitalizations across all industries in Washington state.
L&I wants to reduce that and has teamed with OSHA to create Safety Stand-Down week — a voluntary event that encourages employers to talk with employees about fall hazards and hammer home the importance of fall prevention. The program runs this week.
“Preventable falls — whether from rooftops, ladders or slips and trips — cause many disabling injuries and a number of deaths in our state each year,” said Anne Soiza, assistant director of L&I’s division of occupational safety and health, in a release. “We hope that every employer in the state will set aside time during the Stand-Down to focus on fall prevention.”
To get the ball rolling, L&I has come up with a series of slightly humorous one-minute videos called Eye on Safety. They can be found at www.EyeOnSafety.info. Below is one on walkway obstruction.

Proposed rule expands Clean Water Act jurisdiction

Monday, March 31st, 2014

AGC of America reports that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) proposed their new rule aimed at clarifying the definition of “waters of the U.S.” and which bodies of water fall under federal jurisdiction. This definition is critical to many of the Clean Water Act programs affecting how contractors perform their work, such as the Section 404 Dredge and Fill Permits, Section 402 Stormwater programs, and Section 311 Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures plans.

At this point, the proposed rule appears substantially similar to a previously leaked version, a massive – and unnecessary – expansion in Clean Water Act jurisdiction. Ditches, ephemeral and intermittent streams, tributaries, and isolated waters located in a floodplain or riparian area (which have no defined limit in the rule) are all now potentially jurisdictional.

The rule is expected to be published in the Federal Register soon, with a 90-day comment period in effect after publication.

IMCO shows students construction in action

Monday, March 24th, 2014

imcoOur thanks to IMCO General Construction, Superintendent Joe Lupo and his outstanding crew for hosting a group of Bellingham High School students at Imco’s Lynden Wasterwater Treatment Plant expansion project today.

AGC’s Northern District provided lunch for the whole gang, and Joe had their attention every step of the way on his site tour. Thanks again, Joe!

State Senate considering public works funding bill

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

The Public Works Assistance Account (PWAA) is a mechanism to provide low interest loans to local governments to help them build major infrastructure projects that they would not otherwise be able to afford.

Between 1985 and 2013, the PWAA was used to make loans totaling $2.84 billion for approximately 1,975 local government public works projects. These include the acquisition, construction, repair, replacement or improvement of bridges, streets and roads; water systems; storm and sanitary sewage systems; and solid waste facilities, including recycling.

However, last year the Legislature redirected the Public Works Assistance Account’s funding streams away from capital projects and into the general budget, until 2019.  The unintended consequences of this action are now becoming clear:  Several local infrastructure construction projects have been put on hold because market interest rates for loans for these projects have added millions of dollars to the costs, making them unaffordable for many local governments.

The State House of Representatives recently passed a bill, SHB 2244, which would restore funding to the PWAA in 2015.  This bill passed the House with a strong bipartisan vote of 87-11. By making local infrastructure construction projects feasible, the bill helps spur private economic development which, in turn, boosts state funding for education and other needs.  In addition, this bill will create jobs. Employment in the construction industry in Washington State grew by only 0.2% in 2013, one of the slowest rates in the nation.  This bill will help the industry in its recovery.

Now, attention turns to the Senate.  With the legislative session set to conclude March 13, there isn’t much time for the Senate to act. Everyone is encouraged to contact their State Senators and urge them to support SHB 2244.