Archive for the ‘Project Management’ Category

Watch Atkinson make quick work of SR99 bridge over Broad Street

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

The state Department of Transportation made a time-lapse video of last weekend’s work on SR99 that required closing the highway for several days.
Crews from Atkinson Construction and subcontractor Dickson Co. took just 48 hours to replace the section of SR 99 that crosses above Broad Street. They demolished the old roadway and then added fill to the now-closed section of Broad to level it up with the rest of the highway.
The highway reopened Wednesday.
Nice work!

Video courtesy of WSDOT

General contractor needed for CPAR Board

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

The state has an opening for a general contractor representative on its Capital Projects Advisory Review Board. Applications are due by March 14.

The board evaluates public capital project construction processes and advises the Legislature on policies related to public works delivery methods. There are 23 members on the board, including four legislators and five political subdivision representatives.

Board members must be knowledgeable about public works contracting. They serve four-year terms and can be reappointed once.

Applications can be found at www.governor.wa.gov/boards/application/default.aspx. Questions can be directed to Molly Keenan, Molly.keenan@gov.wa.gov or (360) 902-4110.

DJC profiles the Apple Cup of construction

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

 

Just in time for the Apple Cup football game, the DJC has put together a special section profiling construction projects at the UW and WSU.

Included is a list of the top 10 projects at each school. Who gets bragging rights? If you go by dollar volume, the nod goes to the Huskies, with just over $900 million. That’s more than twice the value of WSU’s top 10.

UW also has the top project: the second phase $186.3 million expansion of the UW Medical Center. WSU’s top project is the $96 million Veterinary and Biomedical Research Building. Of course, WSU’s list of projects includes a $23 million Wine Science Center stocked with 3,500 bottles of wine.

For those wanting to watch football, the Apple Cup will be held Nov. 29 at Husky Stadium – another new project!

Learn what local architects think

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

The DJC surveyed several local architecture and engineering firms for its A&E Perspectives special section. Contractors can learn about upcoming projects, trends and other relevant issues by reading about the designers’ insights.

Check it out!

Under construction forever

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

The following post is from Jason Kane:

According to the Bible, God created heaven and Earth in seven days. Proving that humans are no gods, some men have been constructing buildings for an eternity. It’s understandable that circumstances arise where a building can’t be finished on time. However, most of the following examples of buildings under construction forever can be blamed on the folly of men.

 

Hotel of Doom

The Hotel of Doom under construction in North Korea has suffered under fits of start-and-stop delays for nearly three decades. The 105-story hotel was ordered by Dear Leader No. 1, Kim Il-sung, to proclaim the greatness of his communist slave-labor state. Started in 1987, the construction disaster is composed of three jagged sides to form a pyramid but with no windows or other amenities like rooms, plumbing, lighting or a bar to sip a drink. The name of the hotel, Ryugyong, means Capital of Willows, telling people what to eat when times turn tough. Construction has taken longer than Lady Gaga sobering up from a weekend whiskey binge.

 

One World Trade Center

Once the politicians got involved, everyone knew it would take forever to rebuild the Twin Towers that were destroyed on 9-11 in New York City. True to form, our beloved politicians can’t even agree on a name for the new building much less its design. Started in 2006, the One World Trade Center, also known as Freedom Tower, is plodding along and still unfinished.

 

The World

The wealthy sheiks in Dubai like to build things big with their oil wealth, and The World is no exception. Designed to replicate the world, this construction project is taking place on a series of man-made islands in the shape of a world map to represent the planet. The chief sheik, Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, is begging investors to build gambling resorts on the islands. To date, $18 billion has been spent. Thus far, a single home has been built, and engineers are warning that the islands are sinking. Bookies are taking bets on the day it sinks like Atlantis.

 

International Space Station

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $100 billion ongoing construction project started in 1998. The ISS began as a noble experiment for nations to live together and perform lofty experiments for mankind. That, however, went out the window when a Ukrainian astronaut demonstrated how to chase a shot of vodka around in zero-gravity. The ISS is expected to be completed in 2015, and then scrapped. Till then, it’s party time at the ISS Saloon and Lab.

 

Jason Kane is a former construction worker and avid blogger. Jason writes for Fall Protection USA, a supplier of self-retracting lifelines and other construction safety equipment.

 

Greenfire flames environmental passion

Friday, May 31st, 2013

While Bullitt Center is grabbing headlines as the greenest commercial building in the world, a project in Ballard is taking green building a step further by dedicating about half of its site to urban gardens and open space.

The DJC is profiling the Greenfire Campus project in a special section.

Greenfire’s office building will use about 70 percent less energy than a typical office, and its apartments will use 42 percent less. All that urban agriculture will be fed by two cisterns that store stormwater runoff.

Expect to see more projects like this in the future.

Contractors finally embrace high-tech

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

The old adage is that contractors are slow to adapt to new technology. That may have held true in the past, but go to any job site now and you’re likely to see iPads and other mobile devices hard at work.

Just how these devices speed productivity is the subject of two articles in the DJC’s Construction & Equipment special section. In one article, Skanska discusses how it’s moving toward a paperless job site. In the second, Howard S. Wright profiles its high-tech “Big Room” that is outfitted with various high-tech devices to streamline collaboration and communication between all of the project team members.

Even with all those high-tech gizmos in the Big Room, HSW still designed in a glass wall for posting sticky notes.

Skanska helps with ASC competition

Friday, March 1st, 2013

 

A team led by local Skanska employees pitched in again this year in the Associated Schools of Construction Student Competition in Nevada.

The employees developed a problem statement on sustainable building and LEED that 11 student teams answered with written proposals and oral presentations.

The winning teams and their prize money were: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (first place, $1,500); California State University, Fresno (second place, $1,000); and the University of Washington (third place, $500). Arizona State University won $500 for best presentation.

Skanska’s group consists of 12 employees from Washington, Oregon and California. It collaborates from October to February to develop a problem statement. This is the eighth year the employees have helped out.

Pictured on the UW student team are: (back row, left to right) Matt Watson, Kevin Marck, Eddie Baker and professor John Schaufelberger; (front row) Melody Lian, Michael Abbate and Ben Leventer.

Seattle movers and shakers talk real estate

Thursday, December 13th, 2012
Spectrum is developing 12th & Yesler, the first private mixed-use development at Yesler Terrace.

 

Thanks partly to an ambitious expansion by Amazon.com, apartment projects in Seattle are going up at a dizzying pace: According to a recent CBRE study, 18,500 apartment units will be added over the next three years.

Are developers still on board with the apartment boom, or are they suffering anxiety over the surge in new units? Tim Overland of Security Properties tackles that question in the DJC’s Real Estate Marketplace Northwest special section.

Readers can also learn from local pros about what’s next in the office, industrial and retail markets.

Check it out!

 

China aims for world’s tallest building — in 90 days

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Chinese company Broad Sustainable Building Corp. erects buildings on ridiculously short time frames: It built a low-rise office in nine days earlier this year and a 30-story hotel in 15 days last year.

How do you top that? You build the world’s tallest building in 90 days — duh.

In early 2013, Broad will start building Sky City in the city of Changsha in the Hunan province. At 2,749 feet tall, it will be nearly 33 feet taller than the Burj Khalifa, the current height champion.

Sky City is a fitting name: The building will have apartments for more than 30,000 people, schools, a hospital and more than a dozen helipads.

But, what will be sacrificed by using pre-fab components to construct the world’s tallest building in record time? In a word: style.

Sky City looks like a massive block built from Legos. In contrast, the Burj Khalifa resembles a giant stalagmite reaching for the stratosphere.

More interesting architecture can be found in some of China’s other skyscrapers: the 2,073-foot-tall Shanghai Tower (under construction), the 1,667-foot-tall Taipei 101 and the 1,476-foot-tall Nanjing Greenland Financial Complex.

Sky City

Burj Khalifa

Shanghai Tower

Taipei 101

Nanjing Greenland