Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

D.C. project that houses homeless wins AIA award

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015

Affordable housing has gotten a lot of press lately in Seattle, so it’s interesting to see how other cities are addressing the issue.
LEO A DALY and and its design partner Studio Twenty Seven Architecture were honored recently for a Washington, D.C. project called La Casa, which provides permanent supportive housing for homeless people.

Photos by Anice Hoachlander
Photos by Anice Hoachlander

The American Institute of Architects gave the firms a 2015 Housing Award for the project in the specialized housing category, which recognizes outstanding design of housing that meets unique needs — in this case, those of the chronically homeless, the architecture firms said in a press release.
The seven-story, 34,946-square-foot building provides permanent housing and supportive services for 40 men. Rather than functioning as a temporary shelter, where residents are housed at night and asked to leave during the day, each unit is a single-person efficiency that supports stability and predictability as tenants transition out of homelessness, the firms said.

La Casa employs the “housing first” service model, which offers permanent housing immediately rather than treating sobriety as a prerequisite, and provides supportive services that reduce the risk of participants returning to homelessness.
“This is an important milestone for the District of Columbia in its continued efforts to redefine the concept of transitional housing,” said Stephen Wright, managing principal of LEO A DALY Washington, D.C. “Most housing for the homeless focuses on meeting a temporary emergency. La Casa is different. Both its service model and the facility design embrace the individual, and serve his needs for rehabilitation and growth.”

The firms said their joint-venture team was challenged by the DC Department of Human Services to create a home rather than an institution, and to meet or exceed the quality of the adjacent market-rate apartments.
The project is situated among the high-density, high-rent apartment buildings of Columbia Heights. The architects said La Casa’s design defies the homeless shelter archetype with ample natural light, airy rooms and striking design.

The ground floor of La Casa includes a lobby, support offices, and a mail area. A community room on the second floor opens onto an outdoor terrace. The typical floor has seven dwelling units, including one ADA-accessible unit. A green roof contributes to the design’s LEED-gold certification. Security is provided by security officers, remotely monitored cameras, and secured door access.
The jury for the 2015 Housing Awards includes: Stephen Schreiber, chair, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Jon Dick of Archaeo Architects; Kathy Dixon of K. Dixon Architecture; Jody Mcguire of SALA Architects; and Clair Enlow, who writes the “Design Perspectives” column for the Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce.

Seattle might keep going

Monday, April 27th, 2015

The duration and intensity of the Downtown Seattle development boom is getting a little surprising, beyond even my optimistic guesses from a few years ago. This isn’t just another Seattle-type boom. But here’s the kicker: things seem poised to keep going.

That’s saying something. Between offices, housing, and transportation, this is clearly the busiest we’ve ever been. And we’re four years into it, vs. the typical hard stop far short of that.

The current wave is over 7,000,000 square feet of office and 15,000 housing units by my napkin count, if you gerrymander things up Dexter and Pike/Pine a little, including projects that are at least in active site prep. For offices I believe it’s a record for greater Downtown. For housing it’s a modern-day record by a factor of two.

So why the optimism?
Insignia

First is tech. Amazon is obvious. But there’s also a pretty stunning wave of national or global tech companies setting up or expanding tech offices in greater Downtown. These companies need talent, and the word is out about Seattle. Even if one of our giants stumbles, is there any doubt that other firms would swoop in to hire waves of their people? This is giving developers the confidence to pursue additional projects at a high rate.

Second is a continued inflow of other companies into Downtown from around the region, for example Weyerhauser and MulvannyG2, as well as Expedia though it’s more distant. Companies value Seattle locations for stated reasons like recruitment, business synergies, public transit, and lunch options. Other local nodes are doing a good job of developing downtown-type amenities and synergies, but greater Downtown Seattle has a strong pull right now. (Bellevue will be fine of course; Downtown Tacoma, Downtown Everett, Kirkland, and others are doing a lot of great things too.)

There will be headwinds, like traffic. As the workforce grows, it’s clear that driving can’t grow much with it because there’s no space. Transit will need to improve a lot. Thankfully every new apartment helps reduce the number of inbound commuters.

On that note, housing will keep booming. New office buildings mean a lot more potential Downtown residents, both directly and indirectly. As more office workers compete for the same street, freeway, and transit space, the idea of a six-block walk to work becomes more attractive for longtime workers too, all the more so as district after district adds more residential mass and related services. Some point out that 25-year-old urbanites often become 30-year-olds with kids that want houses, but good news…today’s 20-year-olds will replace them. And how about baby boomers becoming empty-nesters?

Now about condos. Apartment pessimists often point out that renters might start buying in large numbers, sometimes implying that they’ll start picking houses. But many love urban living, roads aren’t getting any easier, and houses and house-ready properties aren’t cheap. If people start buying, many will choose condos. The old presale-based financing method isn’t viable yet, but equity-rich developers can still get loans, so condos are already coming back. We’re at the very beginning of what could be another wave, minus some of the feeding frenzy or zero-down formats that contributed to the bubble and bust.

The current wave of Asian (often Chinese) residents and investors will help our construction volume substantially, as Seattle becomes more of a global destination. Our prices are half of those in Vancouver or San Francisco, and should remain far lower because we can add supply relatively easily. Further, this is helping our status as a business and tourism center across the board, for example by bringing in more tech workers.

Hotels are also just starting. So far the new inventory only deals with 2014’s overly-high occupancy rate, not future growth. Seattle is becoming a bigger tourist destination, including stunning growth in overseas airline traffic last year and so far this year. We plan to build a second convention center (aka the “addition”). Our growing office base brings visitors as well as relocations and interns who live in hotels for weeks or months. Who knows where our hotel demand will go from here, but “up significantly” seems like a good guess.

Biotechs are talking about a lack of space again, particularly with the old Amgen campus off the table. Hospitals have slowed their construction programs after the last wave, but new significant construction is anticipated again at Virginia Mason, Swedish, and Harborview, including medical offices.

The convention center, a new ferry terminal, and post-viaduct streets and public space projects are all a couple years out. Imagine having those to soften any downturn.

Here’s another reason: we might not have a national crisis or massive overbuilding. People love to quote 1982, 1990, 2001, and 2008 like we’re automatically headed for their equivalent. The first dramatically overbuilt hotels and condos, the second did the same for offices in part because of the CAP initiative that curtailed further development, the third involved both a tech bubble and 9/11, and the fourth involved the mortgage crisis and a narrowly-averted depression. We could have another crisis, like Amazon or the global economy crumbling, but nothing looks imminent. As some point we’ll overbuild in key subsectors, but we have a good chance of avoiding the “brick wall.”

Of course all of that is independent of potential problems like the big fees the City might implement, a lack of construction workers, cost escalation if it exceeds market rents, higher interest rates, and so on. Challenges can happen on many fronts.

So caution, always. But so far so good.

Dan Stubbergaard of COBE Architects to lecture

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Dan Stubbergaard, the founder and creative director of COBE Architects in Copenhagen, will give a free lecture at 6 p.m. Wednesday (April 22) at Architecture Hall 147 at the University of Washington.
The UW said COBE is an international architecture and design office whose mission is to contribute to the creation of more decent, equitable, beautiful and sustainable cities. The company seeks to develop specific, innovative solutions that encompass architecture, strategic urban planning, landscape design and research.

COBE Architects designed the Tampere Travel and Service Center for the city of Tampere in Finland.

It has won a number of international competitions since its inception in 2005. Its projects include Nordhavnen, the largest metropolitan redevelopment project in Scandinavia, Norreport Train Station in the center of Copenhagen and The ROCKmagnet, Denmark’s museum of rock music in Roskilde.
COBE Architects designed the Tampere Travel and Service Center (in the pictured rendering) for the city of Tampere in Finland.
In addition to his architectural practice, Stubbergaard has taught at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen and lectures internationally. He is leading a master studio in the UW Department of Architecture in his role as the Scan|Design Foundation 2015 Distinguished Visiting Professor.
His lecture is sponsored by the Scan|Design Foundation and is part of the UW Department of Architecture Spring 2015 Lecture Series.

Paolo Desideri to speak at UW

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Paolo Desideri, a professor of architecture and urban design at the “Roma Tre” campus of the University of Rome, will give a free lecture titled “Form as a Resource” at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the University of Washington Architecture Hall 147.
Desideri directs the Ph.D. program on Landscapes of Contemporary Cities. He is also a principal and partner of ABDR Architetti Associati, which he founded in 1982 along with Maria Laura Arlotti, Michele Beccu and Filippo Raimondo. The UW said the work of his internationally recognized practice focuses on large scale infrastructural and cultural projects in the public and private sectors as well as high density housing complexes. The firm designed the new opera house in Florence, Italy, which is shown in the photo (above) by Luigi Filetici.
The talk is part of the UW Department of Architecture Centennial 2015 Spring Lecture Series. For more information, see http://arch.be.washington.edu/.

My Micro NY is made of prefab modular

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Brookyn firm nArchitects has designed New York’s first micro-apartment complex. The project, called My Micro NY, is made of prefabricated modular units that will be stacked into place this spring and go on the market this summer. The 55 units are 260 to 360 square feet, with rents expected to be $2,000 to $3,000.
For this, renters get kitchenettes, high ceilings, big windows, sliding glass doors, and Juliet balconies along with common spaces and access to storage units.
This is according to a recent story in The New York Times, which says the project is being watched by housing advocates and developers because of its modular construction and because it could mean cheaper housing options in the city where in 2013 about half of all residents were single. A total of 22 of the My Micro NY units will be designated as affordable housing.
The article mentions Seattle as a leader in the micro-apartment movement, and points to the city’s aPodments.

This shows how My Micro NY units are put in place. Images courtesy of nArchitects.
How would you and your stuff fit?
Living in 260 to 360 square feet.

Turn those substation sites into parks

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015
This former substation site at 3904 N.E. 65th St. was sold last year for development. Photos by Cass Turnbull.
Posted by Cass Turnbull

‘It’s not right’.’That’s what I thought when I heard Seattle City Light was going to sell 35 surplus properties to balance their budget. The surplus lots are what are left of 150 electrical substations that became obsolete because of new technology in the 70’s. Today they are typically just an empty concrete pad surrounded by a fence, surrounded by some really nice, mature trees and landscaping. I thought, ‘If you just took down the fence and added a gazebo or a bench and you’d have a great, ready-made pocket park’.

I joined Seattle Green Spaces Coalition, a group formed to Save Our Substations. We soon ran into a stone wall of laws, policies, seriously disinterested departments that said we couldn’t. We were told that legally the property had to be sold. The Parks Department said they didn’t have the money to buy them or maintain them. If we wanted them for greenspace, we’d have to buy them. It’s even crazier, I thought, to ask the public to pay for land that it already owns, so it can be kept for the public good. Over the years some substations have become parks, some have become public housing, but most have been developed by private interests.
Seattle isn’t meeting its current open space goals. With 100,000 to 200,000 new people headed our way over the next few decades, I suspect the amount of open space per person will be much less. The privately owned open spaces are shrinking. Just look at the McMansions, the Three and Four Pack condos, and the apodments. They haven’t enough greenspace to put out a kiddy pool.

I keep wondering where the people living in all those monolithic apartment buildings will go to find something green. Where will the mothers go with their baby buggies, dog walkers go with their dogs? How will they know it is spring if they can’t hear birds or smell the lilacs. Will the kids in those buildings get to play hide and seek, build forts, climb trees, make snowmen, run? These little properties may not amount to much but they can provide solace for the troubled, respite for the weary. They can be place for the young to dream, and a place for the old and the infirm to sit in the sun.

City Light will eventually put this former substation at 7750 28th Ave. N.W. up for sale.

Photos by Cass Turnbull

So I’m hoping that the City Council, courageously being lead by our friend, Tom Rasmsson, can find a way through, or under, or around the stone wall. Because we need all the open space we can get.

A partial list of substations is on the TreePAC.org website.

Cass Turnbull is a lifetime resident of Seattle and founder of TreePAC, a political action committee to advocate for the Urban Forest.

Volunteers to host holiday dinner for Nickelsville encampment

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Volunteers of the Low Income Housing Institute will host a holiday dinner at 6:30 p.m. tonight (Dec. 23) for residents of Nickelsville, a tent city encampment in Seattle for homeless people.
The volunteers will also distribute donated winter clothing, blankets and toiletries at the event at the International District Community Center at 719 Eighth Ave. S.
Pastor Steve Olsen of the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd will give a blessing. The church is the religious sponsor for Nickelsville, which is at 1010 S. Dearborn St. Chris Koh will represent the owner of the property.

Photo by Sharon Lee

In a press release, LIHI said the encampment consists of tents and simple sleeping structures for 40 homeless people and their children. It includes a kitchen/dining tent, cooking area, donation tent, hand washing station, and Honey Buckets.
Nickelsville formed in 2008 as shelters were full, LIHI said. It is a self-managed community of homeless men, women, children and pets.
LIHI said The Emergency Task Force on Unsheltered Homelessness has recommended to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray that additional homeless encampments be allowed to be operated by experienced shelter and service providers on public and private property in the city. This would be in addition to those sponsored by religious or faith-based institutions.

People can make a donation to Nickelsville at 1010 S. Dearborn St., at the LIHI main office at 2407 First Ave. in Seattle, or online at www.LIHI.org.

Microhousing: good or bad?

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

How Small Are They?

Microhousing: good or bad?

Did you know Seattle is the pioneer in microhousing – that is apartments with an average size of 150 square feet?  An article in Politico says this is because of our real estate boom, with a growing population of millennials, permissive city codes. Because of those permissive codes, Seattle’s microhousing units have the smallest square footage in the country.

Not everyone loves seeing these microhousing units popping up in their neighborhoods, tucked in between single-family housing.  What looks like a townhouse with eight small apartments could actually contain 64 units.

As reported in the DJC, Seattle City Council approved new regulations requiring micro units have a minimum of 220 square feet, two sinks and a food preparation area that includes “a cooking appliance.”

Sightline Daily blog says the city’s going backwards with these new regulations. Sightline Executive Director Alan Durning asks, why do we need two sinks in a 220 square foot apartment?

What do you think?

 

 

Frank Lloyd Wright campus to get updated lighting

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s imaginative Taliesin Spring will receive an update from award winning lighting designer and founder of Studio Lux, Christopher Thompson, who will introduce energy-efficient technology to the historic site.

Photo courtesy of Studio Lux

Taliesin Spring was Wright’s home and drafting studio in Spring Green, Wis. The property was donated to the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation upon Wright’s death in 1959. It is now one of two campuses for the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.
Taliesin Spring suffers from antiquated and poorly performing lighting systems throughout the campus.
Studio Lux will design systems that use high efficacy sources such as LED lamps, which will improve light levels, restore the original design intent, and decrease campus-wide power use while being sensitive to the site’s historical nature.
The foundation first sought out Thompson’s firm to create a Net-Zero energy zone for Taliesin West, the main campus of The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. That campus is in Scottsdale, Ariz.
Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his vision for urban planning in the United States.

Should you mix affordable and upscale housing?

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013
Outdoor seating and landscaped areas would surround the ground floor of the R.C. Hedreen Co. project. Image courtesyof LMN Architects

Should “affordable” housing be mixed with high-income housing within the same building? That’s the subject of a short video by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat at http://tiny.cc/o5r04w/.

Addressing the question are Nigel Biggs of CBRE, Harry Handelsman of Manhattan Loft Corp., Christoph Ingenhoven of ingenhoven architects, Ian Simpson of Ian Simpson Architects, and Rafael Viñoly of Rafael Viñoly Architects. The video is part of a monthly series by the CTBUH.

In Seattle, R.C. Hedreen Co. has proposed including affordable units in a project that will not have upscale apartments or condos, but will have a hotel.
The project is a 40-story convention hotel complex at Ninth and Stewart that will have a five-story podium with a 35-story, 1,680-room hotel on the south end and 154 units of housing on the north end, reserved for people making 80 percent or less of area median income. Hedreen is building the north end units to get higher density through a city incentive program.