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January 5, 2018

Landmark nomination for building on site of proposed 28-story tower

Image by Ankrom Moisan Architects [enlarge]
Ankrom Moisan Architects is the architect and Sellen Construction is the general contractor on the project, which would have 268 apartments and 4,900 square feet of retail.

Seattle's Landmarks Preservation Board on Wednesday nominated as a city landmark a building at 820 John St. in South Lake Union where a 28-story residential tower is planned.

However, it declined to designate as a landmark a building at 55 Bell St. in Belltown, where a mixed-use building is proposed.

The vote was 4 to 3 to nominate the exterior of 820 John. The board will decide whether to designate it as a landmark at a meeting at 3:30 p.m. Feb. 21 in Boards & Commissions Room L2-80 of City Hall.

The vote was 6 to 1 against on 55 Bell, a 61-year-old modern-style two-story structure that was originally built as a union hall. It was designed by Thomas Albert Smith, who worked in association with T. M. Carstensen Co., a commercial and industrial consulting firm.

Bellevue investors Julia and Chun Fan purchased the property in 2016 for $6.7 million through an LLC. Redevelopment plans call for 48 units and 31 parking spaces. Citizen Design is listed as the local architect.

Seattle-based Pillar Properties and local investor Rich Reel plan the tower at 820 John St. across from Denny Park. Ankrom Moisan Architects is the architect and Sellen Construction is the general contractor on the project, which would have 268 apartments and 4,900 square feet of retail space. Parking for 252 vehicles and bike storage would be underground.

Other team members include Magnusson Klemencic Associates, structural engineer; KPFF Consulting Engineers, civil engineer; Rushing, mechanical/electrical engineer; and Hewitt, landscape architect

The 1954 building on the site was designed by Kenneth St. Clair Ripley. It was constructed by E. F. Shuck Construction Co. as office and showroom space that was an addition to an adjacent Modern-style commercial structure.

In Seattle, the landmark nomination process is required in certain circumstances as part of getting a land use permit if a structure on the site could meet the landmark criteria.

Landmarks may be demolished only if the owner can demonstrate there is no reasonable economic use. They cannot be significantly altered without a permit from the preservation board.


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