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November 18, 2010

UW ramping up $833M housing plan

Images courtesy of Mahlum [enlarge]
Cedar Apartments will have 350 beds and is geared to single students. Construction began in March and students are expected to move in next fall.

In an effort to allow more students to live on campus, the University of Washington is adding 3,000 beds over five years to its housing stock. The school also plans to renovate its existing campus housing, about 5,000 beds, by 2020. The total budget for its 10-year housing master plan is $833.5 million.

New construction is being built in three phases, with the $162 million first phase started earlier this year.

W.G. Clark Construction and Walsh Construction each are working on housing complexes in the west campus area; two of the four projects that make up the first phase, which will add 1,650 beds.

Clark is building Cedar Apartments, the only non-dorm building in the first phase, which will have 350 beds and is geared to single students. Cedar will have two- and four-bedroom units with a full bathroom for every two bedrooms, and studios with a kitchenette and private bath.

Walsh is building Poplar Hall, which will have 270 beds. Students will have the option of double rooms or studios with private baths.

In the 270-bed Poplar Hall, students will have a choice between double rooms or studios with private baths.

Both Cedar and Poplar are expected to be finished in August 2011.

Clark and Walsh plan to start construction next January on the last two projects in phase one: Elm and Alder halls.

Elm Hall will have 430 beds in double rooms and studios with private baths, as well as a cafe that opens onto a plaza containing an American elm tree. Alder Hall will have about 600 beds in double rooms and studios with private baths. It also will have an urban market, a multiuse auditorium, and a conference center with space for live-learn academic opportunities.

Elm and Alder should finished in August of 2012.

Mahlum is the architect for phase one. Its team includes: Robert Sabbatini, urban planner; Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, landscape architect; Coughlin Porter Lundeen, structural engineer; SvR, civil engineer; PAE Consulting, mechanical and electrical engineer; and Rider Levett Bucknall, cost estimator.

The second phase will create about 900 beds in four or five apartment buildings for single students where Mercer Hall stands. On a second site, 200 or more student apartments are planned in a seven- to 10-story building. The designers are Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects’ Seattle office and Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios of London. The gc/cm is W.G. Clark Construction Co.

Alder Hall, for which construction will begin in January, is part of a first-phase student housing plan that will add 1,650 beds. It will open to students in the fall of 2012.

The $108 million second phase could open in stages, with the first half open in August of 2013 and the rest a year later.

Initial designs are being worked on for phase three. Mithun is the architect and Skanska USA the gc/cm. The final phase could renovate Terry Hall and replace Lander Hall with new dorms. Terry and Lander have a total of about 1,300 beds. Terry Hall would keep its 600 beds and the Lander replacement would have about 1,200 beds. The proposed budget is $85 million.

UW is considering whether to recombine and expand the scopes of work for the phases two and three. The board of regents was scheduled to discuss the proposal on Nov. 18.

Under the proposal, the second-phase budget would expand to $245.5 million, and the scope would grow to include the replacement of Lander Hall. Third-phase work, budgeted at $237 million, would include a renovation and addition to Terry Hall, replacement of the 1101 Cafe building and a renovation of the McMahon residence hall.

A fourth phase would entail renovations for Haggett Hall, McCarty Hall and Hansee Hall. The proposed budget is $189 million.


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