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May 2, 2014

Light-Gauge Steel Framing (Washington) --
Seattle Children’s Hospital (phase one expansion)

Photo by Benjamin Benschneider Photography
Performance Contracting installed structural metal framing, sheathing, weather barriers, thermal insulation and stucco as part of the hospital expansion.

Location: Seattle

Contractor: Performance Contracting

Architect: ZGF Architects

Team: GTS Interior Supply; The Supply Guy; Scafco Steel Stud Co.; CertainTeed Gypsum; Hamilton Drywall Products; Hilti

The project was an eight-story addition to the existing building near the University of Washington. The addition is comprised of structural steel, concrete and structural metal framing. The facade is finished in imported custom tile, metal panels, colored-glass fins and stucco.

Primary work by Performance Contracting involved public areas and patient room build-outs on levels six through eight and modification of the existing hospital space.

Performance Contracting also completed exterior structural metal framing, exterior sheathing, weather barriers, thermal insulation, stucco, interior metal framing, gypsum wallboard and finishing, suspended gypsum-board ceilings, Fry Reglet metal column covers, glass fiber-reinforced gypsum and concrete columns, fire-stopping, wood and acoustical ceilings, and X-ray protection.

Some unique features of the expansion are the continuous serpentine soffits in the patient rooms, mirrored Serpentina Axiom trim outside the patient rooms, and elliptical columns. Additional diversity was created with patient room porch-front framing supported by slab inserts, suspended-threaded rod and custom off-angle bent plates.

A bridge walkway connects the addition to the existing structure.

Judge’s comment: “The special structural requirements imposed on this project created framing requirements not often experienced on projects in the Northwest. The team rose to the challenge and constructed a beautiful project that will provide a wonderful location for children to stay and heal.”


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