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May 2, 2014

Exterior Commercial (Oregon) -- Port of Morrow SAGE Center

Photo courtesy of Generation Plastering
The entrance to SAGE Center resembles a grain silo. It’s made of EIFS and special coatings.

Location: Boardman

Contractor: Generation Plastering

Architect: Terence L. Thornhill

Team: Standard Paint & Flooring; Parex USA

The SAGE (Sustainable Agriculture and Energy) Center is a 23,000-square-foot museum/visitor center with interactive features. Located off Interstate 84, travelers can stop to learn about the science behind farming, food processing and alternative energy production such as wind, methane digesters, alternative fuels and natural gas.

The entrance’s cylindrical towers give visitors the feeling they are walking into a grain silo. Visitors can also step into the basket of a hot-air balloon and take a virtual tour of fields and the Columbia River, or plow virtual fields with a tractor.

“We wanted to pay homage to the abundant agriculture influences without being overly playful with them,” architect Terence Thornhill said.

There were several challenges on this project. First, it had to meet the state’s new energy codes/building requirements. Parex USA Optimum WaterMaster EIFS system was used to achieve this.

Another challenge was to make the grain silos look real, which was accomplished by using Parex metallic coatings as the finish over the EIFS. Parex ColorFast was specified to minimize fading that is typical in a sun-baked location such as Boardman.

The exterior was also finished with Parex AquaSol, which hydrophobically repels water and self cleans, reflects UV rays, saves energy by lowering surface temperatures, and reduces pollution by breaking down smog molecules through photocatalytic reaction.

Judge’s comment: “The excellent installation of the beautiful EIFS products is an extreme example of the flexibility of these materials. The homogeneous design not only complements the landscape but has helped create an energy-efficient structure.”


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