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May 26, 2017

Heavy/Industrial

Photo courtesy of Pacific Pile & Marine
The project removed a 138,080-square-foot timber pier, including 3,900 creosote-treated piles.


Mukilteo Ferry Terminal Phase 1

Location: Mukilteo

General contractor: Pacific Pile & Marine

Owner/developer: Washington State Ferries

This work represented the first phase of a multimodal project to relocate the existing Mukilteo Ferry Terminal to a former U.S. Department of Defense fuel storage facility known as the tank farm. The property includes a large pier extending into Possession Sound.

The project was accomplished while complying with environmental constraints from over 12 different federal and state agencies.

Deconstruction of the tank farm began in 2015 with a planned construction schedule of two years. In-water work was restricted to between July 15 and Feb. 15 each season, with some elements, such as dredging and pile extraction, further constrained by the National Marine Fisheries Service.

The project removed 138,080 square feet of over-water timber pier, including approximately 3,900 creosote-treated piles. Piles were removed with a vibratory hammer and transloaded and transported for disposal to a landfill in Eastern Washington.

Pacific Pile & Marine utilized a shearing method to remove the pile, significantly reducing the duration required for demolition, condensing the in-water work window to a single season. Twenty-one thousand cubic yards of material were dredged in the navigation channel for open-water disposal.

The Mukilteo-Clinton ferry route is part of state Route 525, a major transportation corridor connecting Whidbey Island to the Seattle-Everett area.

The Washington State Department of Transportation said Pacific Pile & Marine “used innovative means and methods to demo pier .... This accelerated their progress and allowed them to complete dredging during the first work window, eliminating the need to return next season.”





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