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September 26, 2013

Surveys 2013: Ridolfi Inc.


‘The technical aspects of the jobs, as well as the funding, have become more complex. A lot of projects are requiring multiple sources of funding to pull the project off.’
-- Callie Ridolfi

Specialty: Environmental consulting, civil engineering

Management: Callie Ridolfi, president

Founded: 1990

Headquarters: Seattle

2013 projected revenues: $5 million

2014 projected revenues: $5 million

Current projects: Working with the Yakutat village and the Yakutat Tribe in Alaska to develop a strategic energy plan; working on a habitat restoration plan for the Yakima River



With its ability to diversify into new sectors and modify its existing services, Ridolfi Inc. is weathering the ups and downs of the post-recession economy.

Callie Ridolfi, president and founder of the environmental consulting and civil engineering firm, said she is optimistic.

“I see the future as very bright,” said Ridolfi. “Our firm is emerging from the recession very strong, with a steady flow of work.”

The company, in some cases, helps its clients secure funding needed to do environmental work. It also helps with grant writing.

“The technical aspects of the jobs, as well as the funding, have become more complex,” Ridolfi said. “A lot of projects are requiring multiple sources of funding to pull the project off.”

In southeastern Alaska, Ridolfi Inc. is working with the Yakutat village and the Yakutat Tribe to develop a strategic energy plan. The project includes an audit of village buildings such as schools, a grocery store and community building, to determine how they can be more energy efficient.

The tribe wants to find less expensive and more sustainable fuel sources, including solar and wind, Ridolfi said. “Some of the folks in southeastern Alaska are living with high energy costs, which is driving them to find lower-cost options.”

Restoring the Yakima

For the city of Yakima, Ridolfi Inc. is working on a habitat restoration plan for the Yakima River. The work is needed to set the stage for new recreation trails near the river and for salmon habitat restoration, as well as flood preparedness.

“Habitat restoration projects are getting increasingly complex,” said Ridolfi. “We’re not just talking about adding plants to riverbanks.”

With increased project complexity, Ridolfi calls on her firm’s experts in civil engineering, biology, chemistry and hydrology.

Projects such as the Yukatat village strategic energy plan represent a relatively new sector for the firm, and are a way for it to continue growing, Ridolfi said.

Doubling by acquisition

The firm also used the recent acquisition of EcoChem — an environmental chemistry consulting firm — to double its staff size from 20 to 40.

A majority of the firm’s work is in the public sector. “We do a bit of work in Oregon and Idaho, but we’re working primarily in the Northwest Cascadia region and southeast Alaska,” Ridolfi said.

A key to the firm’s success, she said, is working closely with clients on all aspects of a project. “We do a lot of collaboration with communities,” she said.


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