Welcome, sign in or click here to subscribe.
Login: Password:

  Greenfire



 

 

Greenfire
A Special Feature of DJC.COM
May 31, 2013
Cover image by Johnston Architects




Green campus fires on all sustainable cylinders
Greenfire in Ballard is a mix of sensible sustainability and social sustainability.
By RAY JOHNSTON
Johnston Architects

Greenfire ready to generate environmental dividends
Using the earth as an energy storage cell is expected to dramatically reduce heating and cooling costs of the buildings.
By CHRIS WHITMYRE
PSF Mechanical

Energy use?
Other buildings are green with envy

Greenfire’s office building will use about 70 percent less energy than a typical office; its apartments will use 42 percent less.
By TOM MARSEILLE
WSP

Green vision carries over to the construction process
More than 99 percent of the construction waste was recycled on the Greenfire project.
By ELIZABETH RINEHART
Walsh Construction Co./WA

Sharing space with nature in the city
New habitat at Greenfire ranges from native plants in the moist, shady wetland garden to drought-tolerant plants on the dry, sunny roof gardens.
By MARK S. GARFF
The Watershed Co.

Urban agriculture blossoms in Ballard
Greenfire used the Living Building Challenge as its roadmap.
By MARK BUEHRER
2020 Engineering

Are you ready for some urban farming?
The average vegetable travels 1,500 miles before it gets to your dinner plate.
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


A Look Around
The name of the Greenfire Campus comes from the writing of Aldo Leopold, an early environmentalist and pivotal figure in the United States conservation movement.


Photo courtesy of Johnston Architects

Just the facts

Name:
Greenfire Campus

Location:
Ballard

Size:
31,000 square feet in two buildings

Opened:
May 18




The team

Owner/principal:
Rose Letwin (environmental philanthropist and
founder of the Wilburforce Foundation)

Project manager: Seneca Group

Architect: Johnston Architects

General contractor:
Walsh Construction Co./WA

Interior design:
Robin Chell Design

Landscape architect:
The Watershed Co.



Mechanical design-build: PSF Mechanical

MEP design development: WSP

Electric design-build: Merit Electric

Civil engineer: 2020 Engineering

Structural engineer: DCI Engineers

Property manager: Blanton Turner


Photo courtesy of Johnston Architects



Energy Conservation

The energy benchmark for Greenfire is the Architecture 2030 Challenge. This means that all comparisons are against 2030 goals, not today’s standards.

Office

• Designed to use 70 percent less energy per square foot than the average office building from the 2030 Challenge benchmark

• Energy savings supports LEED platinum certification and the 2030 Challenge

• Hybrid natural ventilation/cooling of office/retail building minimizes use of fans and mechanical cooling

• Integrated ground source heat pump optimizes energy production, storage and sharing between the varying building uses

• Lighting concept exceeds Seattle Energy Code by as much as 35 percent

• 75 percent of heat is recovered from exhausted air

Apartments

• Designed to use at least 40 percent less energy per square foot than the average multifamily building from the 2030 Challenge benchmark

• Seeking LEED gold certification

• Integrated ground source heat pump optimizes energy production, storage and sharing between the varying building uses

• Lighting concept exceeds Seattle Energy Code by as much as 35 percent

• 75 percent of heat is recovered from exhausted air

Solar

• Solar hot water system produces 70 percent of domestic hot water in the apartment building

• A 10-kilowatt solar PV system reduces purchased electrical energy by as much as 5 percent annually

Water

• “Greenfactor” score of 6.12, twice the city-required minimum of 3.0

• Largest project in the city that uses rainwater as its sole source of irrigation

• All irrigation needs met by collected rainwater

• Rainwater harvested saves 70,000 gallons of city drinking water per year

• 32,000 gallons of rainwater storage

• 43 percent of the total site area is landscaped

• 46 percent of the landscaped area is planted with native plants

• 95 percent of the landscaped area is planted with native and/or drought-tolerant plants

• 16 percent of the landscaped area is set aside for urban agriculture

• 8,000 square feet of planting is considered high habitat value

• 61 trees will be planted

• 150 different plant species will be planted

• 55 different plant species on the roofs

• Chlorine-free rainwater used for organic food gardens

Construction recycling

• 99 percent diversion rate

Restoring nature

Just over half of the rainwater that falls on the site is used by the landscapes. This is close to the amount of rainwater that would have been used by the old growth forest trees that were once on the site. Typical developments have more than 90 percent water runoff due to impervious surfaces.



Special section team

Section editor: Benjamin Minnick

Section design: Jeffrey Miller

Web design: Lisa Lannigan

Advertising: Matt Brown



Advertisers:

Seneca Group www.senecagroup.com

Sustainable Civil Engineering 2020 www.2020engineering.com

Blanton Turner www.blantonturner.com

DCI Engineers www.dci-engineers.com

Johnston Architects www.johnstonarchitects.com

PSF Mechanical www.psfmechanical.com

RDH Building Sciences www.rdhbe.com

Robin Chell Design www.robinchelldesign.com

Seneca Group www.senecagroup.com

Walsh Construction www.walshconstructionco.com

The Watershed Company www.watershedco.com

WSP www.wspgroup.com/usa/


--